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Thursday, April 7, 7:00 PM: writers Miguel Angel Hernández and Reinaldo Laddaga

April 01, 2016

Spanish writer Miguel Angel Hernández will read his text: “El arte en la novela: contaminaciones entre crítica y literatura”; Argentinian wtiter Reinaldo Ladagga will present “Editor, curador, escritor, artista: juego de roles en la literatura y el arte contemporáneos.”

Introduced by writer and essayist Sergio Chejfec (NYU Creative Writing in Spanish Program).

With the support of NYU Department of Spanish and Portuguese and the MFA Program in Creative Writing in Spanish.

The Creative Writing in Spanish Program acknowledges the generous support of Santander Bank through its Santander Universities Program.



Related Event

Creative Writing in Spanish: Miguel Angel Hernández and Reinaldo Laddaga

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Wednesday, March 30 at 1:30 p.m. : Cuban artist ALEXIS ESQUIVEL

March 28, 2016

The KJCC Sawyer Seminar "Cuban Futures Beyond the Market: Geopolitics and Interpretive Infrastructures in Humanities, Social Science and the Law" invites you to a conversatorio with Alexis Esquivel: "El tema racial en el arte cubano contemporáneo: de Queloides a Drapetomanía."

Alexis Esquivel is a Cuban visual and performance artist whose work has often explored themes of history, race, and identity, particularly in a Cuban cultural context.

In Spanish.

Co-sponsored by NYU Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies and NYU King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center.


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Video (bilingual): check it out if you missed "Beyond Sorrow: Rethinking Flamenco for the 21st Century"

March 08, 2016

With flamenco singer Marina Heredia (Flamenco Festival New York), dancer, choreographer, writer, and organizer Paloma McGregor (Angela’s Pulse, Dancing While Black), Latina/o cultural theorist Josefina Saldaña-Portillo (NYU Department of Social and Cultural Analysis), artist and performance theorist Sebastian Calderón Bentin (NYU Tisch School of the Arts), and flamenco dancer and scholar K. Meira Goldberg (CUNY Grad Center, Fashion Institute of Technology.)

Historically, flamenco artistry was generated as a dazzling, resistant response to the discrimination and poverty endured by the Roma of Spain and other marginalized communities in Andalusia. Today, flamenco is marked not only by its inheritance of loss and art but by the multiple forces of culture, diaspora, identity, politics, and market. This panel asks questions to reframe the life and futures of flamenco. We will consider how contemporary flamenco artists negotiate the fine line between embracing an artistic inheritance and breaking free of stereotype. Can flamenco survive in the fullness of its profound and deep expression without being boxed in by obligatory sorrow and suffering? What will the new sources of inspiration be for the generations of artists who have not known the suffering of their ancestors? How does flamenco’s evolution in the context of globalized 21st century culture reflect changing ideas about gender and race? How do today’s artists beat a path to the future, finding new and authentic creative impetus?

This panel was part of the 13th edition of Flamenco Festival New York (March 9-19, 2016). www.flamencofestival.org.

Co-sponsored by Flamenco Festival New York and Foundation of Iberian Music-CUNY Graduate Center.




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Wednesday, February 24, 7:00 p.m.: Reporting on War and Power in the Americas

February 22, 2016

Join Jon Lee Anderson, Spring 2016 Andrés Bello Chair in Latin American Cultures and Civilizations, journalist, biographer, war correspondent and New Yorker staff writer, in his first public lecture entitled "Reporting on War and Power in the Americas."

An incisive and courageous chronicler of Latin American political life, power, culture, war, and global conflict, and a defender of journalism and journalists in the hemisphere, Anderson is in residence as Andrés Bello Chair in Latin American Cultures and Civilizations as the KJCC continues to focus on Journalism, Reporting, and Public Intellectual Practices. As part of his residence at NYU, Anderson is teaching the graduate course Revolution, Power and Reportage at NYU's Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies (CLACS).

If you missed the talk you may check it out here.


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KJCC welcomes Jon Lee Anderson as Andrés Bello Chair for Spring 2016

February 01, 2016

The King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center is delighted to welcome eminent journalist, biographer, war correspondent and New Yorker staff writer Jon Lee Anderson to New York University this spring. An incisive and courageous chronicler of Latin American political life, power, culture, war, and global conflict, and a defender of journalism and journalists in the hemisphere, Anderson is in residence as Andrés Bello Chair in Latin American Cultures and Civilizations as the KJCC continues to focus on Journalism, Reporting, and Public Intellectual Practices. As part of his residence at NYU, Anderson is teaching the graduate course Revolution, Power and Reportage at NYU's Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies (CLACS). During his tenure, he will be giving two public lectures and organizing a symposium to be held at the King Juan Carlos Center later this spring.

Jon Lee Anderson began his career in the early 1980s, reporting on Central America’s civil wars for TIME magazine. As a New Yorker staff writer since 1998, he has covered numerous international conflicts, including those in Syria, Ukraine, Libya, Iraq, Afghanistan, Lebanon, Somalia, Sudan, Angola, Mali, Liberia, and Central African Republic. His work has appeared in The New York Times, Harper's, El Pais, Internazionale, The Financial Times, Guardian, The Sunday Times, TIME, and The Nation.

Anderson has reported extensively on Latin America, writing on Brazil, Cuba, Venezuela, Nicaragua, and other nations and zones of conflict. He works to safeguard the rights of journalists and is on the board of the Colombia-based Gabriel Garcia Marquez Foundation for Journalism, and regularly teaches workshops for Latin American reporters. Anderson has profiled a number of international public figures such as Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Augusto Pinochet, Fidel Castro, Hugo Chavez, King Juan Carlos of Spain, Hamid Karzai, Mahmoud Ahmadinajad and Charles Taylor.

Jon Lee Anderson is also a celebrated biographer, essayist and the author of books on contemporary conflict, military campaigns and political leadership. He is the author of Che Guevara: A Revolutionary Life, an authoritative and celebrated biography of the iconic Latin American political leader. While researching the book in Bolivia, he discovered the hidden location of Guevara's skeletal remains, after which they were exhumed and returned to Cuba.

Anderson has a number of other books, including Guerrillas: Journeys In the Insurgent World, The Lion's Grave: Dispatches from Afghanistan, and The Fall of Baghdad. He is also the coauthor of Inside the League and War Zones: Voices from the World's Killing Grounds with his brother Scott Anderson.

He has won a number of awards, most recently Columbia University's 2013 Maria Moors Cabot award.

Anderson's next book project is a biography of Fidel Castro.

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Happy Holidays!!!!

December 14, 2015

The King Juan Carlos Center staff wish you a happy holiday season!

We will see you back in the Spring semester.

Happy New Year!!!!

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Friday, December 11, 6:30 p.m. - PANEL: SEIS PLUS: An Evening With The Bronx Photo League

December 03, 2015

The landscape may have changed, but the South Bronx is still home to photographers committed to documenting their neighborhoods from the inside. Chief among them are the members of the Bronx Photo League, a group whose recent Jerome Avenue Workers Project looks at a blue-collar community facing development and gentrification. Join us for a conversation with shooters David "Dee" Delgado, Nina Robinson, Rhynna Santos and Edwin Torres as we explore changing neighborhoods, technologies and audiences.

In partnership with Bronx Documentary Center, The Loisada Center, Tools of War and Tats Cru.


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Wednesday, December 2, 7:00 p.m. - “Tribunes for the People: Rebel Latino Writers in American Journalism, From Ricardo Flores Magón and Jovita Idar to Jesús Colón”

November 30, 2015

“Tribunes for the People: Rebel Latino Writers in American Journalism, From Ricardo Flores Magón and Jovita Idar to Jesús Colón” by Juan González, Fall 2015 Andrés Bello Chair in Latin American Cultures and Civilizations, (Columnist for The Daily News, co-host of Democracy Now!

Reception to follow.

RSVP FOR THIS EVENT HERE.

THIS EVENT WILL BE LIVE STREAMED HERE.

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Lin-Manuel Miranda, Sonia Manzano and Juan González in Conversation: Latino Performing Artists and their Community

November 25, 2015


This unprecedented event, hosted by the King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center and The Office of the Vice Provost for Faculty, Arts, Humanities and Diversity, took place on November 16 at 7:00 p.m. at NYU's Skirball Center for the Performing Arts (566 LaGuardia Place at Washington Square).

Introduced by NYU Vice Provost Uli Baer and KJCC Director Ana Dopico.

Juan González, the longtime Daily News columnist and Democracy Now co-host, will led a dialogue with these acclaimed writers and performers of stage and screen about their lives, their work, the arts, and the cultural politics that have shaped their careers and communities.

Sonia Manzano is a fifteen time Emmy Award winning TV writer, actress, novelist, and memoirist, the originator and long time embodiment of the groundbreaking character “Maria” on Sesame Street, and author of Becoming Maria: Love and Chaos in the South Bronx.

Lin-Manuel Miranda is a Grammy and Tony Award winning actor, playwright, composer, 2015 MacArthur Fellow, and the creator and protagonist of the Broadway hits Hamilton and In the Heights.

Sponsored by NYU King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center and made possible with the generous support of NYU’s Office of the Vice Provost for Faculty, Arts, Humanities and Diversity.




Related Event

Latino Performing Artists and Their Community

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Tonight, 7:30 PM Film screening: La Ciudad (David Riker, 1998, 1h 28’)

November 20, 2015

Organized by NYU Professor James Fernández.

The film was screened at NYU King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center when it first came out 15 years ago, and now we will screen the newly remastered version, at this special commemorative event. Director David Riker and some of the film’s cast will be present at the screening and discussion.

Glenn Lovell wrote in “ Variety”: “A heartbreaking look at the abuses heaped on Latino laborers in New York City, David Riker’s “The City” can take its place beside such postwar neo-realist classics as Rossellini’s “Paisan” and Buñuel’s “Los Olvidados.”

trailer: https://vimeo.com/129712324

In Spanish with English subtitles.

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Tonight, Thursday, November 19, 7:00 p.m. - Unpayable Debt: Capital, Activism and the Puerto Rican Financial Crisis

November 19, 2015

With Frances Negrón (Columbia University), Juan González (Fall 2015 Andrés Bello Chair in Latin American Cultures and Civilizations), Carlos Pabón (University of Puerto Rico), and Rafael Bernabe (University of Puerto Rico). Co-moderated by Arnaldo Cruz-Malavé (Fordham University) and Rubén Ríos (NYU).

In English. Reception to follow.

With the support of NYU Department of Spanish and Portuguese and the MFA Program in Creative Writing in Spanish.

The Creative Writing in Spanish Program acknowledges the generous support of Santander Bank through its Santander Universities Program.



Related Event

“Puerto Rico’s Debt Crisis: Economic Collapse in America’s Biggest Colony And What Can be Done About It”

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Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. - Juicio Oral: Los Entuertos del Quijote en la Versión Quechua

November 17, 2015

The recent news of the translation of the second part of don Quijote to Quechua –the most widely spoken indigenous language in the Andean region- has raised great expectations in Peru, Latin America and Spain, countries that are celebrating the 400th year anniversary of the book’s publication (part two,1615). However a careful reading of the Quechua version of Cervantes’ novel (part one), contains inaccuracies and arbitrariness that begin from the very title. This conference will analyze the translation of Demetrio Tupac Yupanqui that intersperses two incompatible codes, forcing the oral nature of Quechua language into writing discourse of a novel, which make it illegible for Quechua speaker readers.

This lecture will be presented by Dr. Odi Gonzales, Quechua professor at NYU. Dr. Gonzales is a Peruvian researcher, poet, translator, with an expertise in Quechua oral traditions.

See more at: www.clacs.as.nyu

RSVP for this event here.

Co-sponsored by the Quechua Language and Culture at the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies (CLACS), and the King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center (KJCC).

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Keynote at 6:30p.m. today: Caribbean Subjects: Media, Culture, and Representation November 13 2:00pm - 8:00pm

November 13, 2015

This event will explore the uniqueness and particularities of cultural production and the ubiquitousness in the transnational cultural industries of Caribbean subjects. Bringing together scholars of popular culture and race and gender dynamics in the region, the presentations will explore the genealogies of Latino culture, migration and cultural borrowing, cultural networks, and the tensions between national identities and cosmopolitanism, high culture and popular culture.

Speakers include keynote Frances Negrón Muntaner (Columbia University), Luis Rosario Albert (Universidad del Turabo), Odette Casamayor (University of Connecticut), Arlene Dávila (NYU), Jill Meredith Lane (NYU), Wilfredo Burgos Matos (CUNY), Nicholas Mirzoeff (NYU), Zaira Rivera (Universidad de Puerto Rico), Yeidy Rivero (University of Michigan), Yesenia Fernández Selier (NYU), Alex Trillo (Saint Peter’s University).

ORGANIZED BY YESENIA SELIER.

** PLEASE NOTE: The Conference Takes Place at Two Locations: Afternoon panels (2:00-5:30 PM) will be at 239 Greene Street, Floor 8. Keynote will be delivered at the Auditorium/Screening Room of the King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center (6:30 PM) **

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On-going colloquium Friday: #CubAngola 40: Rethinking the 1975 Afro-Cuban War

November 06, 2015

With Piero Gleijeses, Linda Heywood, Christabelle Peters, Adriano Mixinge, Tony Pinelli and Ned Sublette.

In November of 1975 the Cuban government made a major military intervention in Angola’s independence process. Forty years later we gather to commemorate this historical moment and its consequences with #CubAngola40 - a daylong symposium at New York University. The conference gathers participants, witnesses, critics and scholars to remember and reconsider the event, to illuminate its political and cultural consequences and rethink the relevance of this important chapter of Global South history.

What happened in November of 1975?

Forty years ago, the Cuban government launched Operation Carlota, a large-scale military intervention in Angola while this African country was on the eve of its independence from Portugal. The Cuban military victory over the forces supported by the United States and South Africa represented an explosive chapter of the Cold War and of the African decolonization. The consequences were immediate and long-lasting, since the resulting defeat of South African troops contributed to the end of the white-supremacist regime of Apartheid. In that context, the intervention of a small Latin American country into the two main geopolitical struggles of the time was not only unique, it represented an audacious South-to-South cooperation.

Nonetheless, this important historical fact still underrepresented. A great deal of historical and cultural material remains open to exploration, discussion, and scholarship. Hence, #CubAngola40 begins to redress the scant attention this event has received and will strive to answer many pertinent and suspended questions:

What did the internationalism behind this event mean,or what could it have meant to today’s racial politics of the African diaspora and to transnational solidarity?

What political role did the Bantu-based cultures shared by both countries since early slave trade bring to bear in the Angola-Cuba context?

In light of recent changes in US-Cuba relations, can we expect new narratives, revelations, or perspectives regarding the intervention?

Check here for more information and program schedule. Also follow this link to RSVP.

Organized by NYU CLACS.



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Tonight at 6:30 p.m.: Close-Ups on Revolution: the Nicaraguan Films of Marc Karlin - with Susan Meiselas and Hermione Harris

October 29, 2015

With SUSAN MEISELAS and HERMIONE HARRIS

VOYAGES (1985), 42 min.

SCENES FOR A REVOLUTION (1991), 110 min.

MARK KARLIN (1943-1999), one of the greatest British filmmakers of his generation, created an outstanding body of philosophically rich, formally bold work that explored themes of history, memory, labour, and political agency in a time of neoliberal despair.

Foremost among his achievements are the five films he made on the Nicaraguan revolution: spanning the Sandinista decade, focussing on rural and urban grassroots movements, attentive to the sadness and disappointments of the revolutionary process, they are a remarkable chronicle of a remarkable era.

MEMORY AND ILLUMINATION: THE FILMS OF MARC KARLIN, the first US retrospective of his work, begins with two works from this period. VOYAGES (1985) is composed of stills by renowned Magnum photographer SUSAN MEISELAS taken in 1978 and 1979 during the overthrow of the fifty-year dictatorship of the Somoza family. Written in the form of a letter from Meiselas to Karlin, it is a ruminative and often profound exploration of the ethics of witnessing, the responsibilities of war photography and the politics of the still image,

SCENES FOR A REVOLUTION (1991) is a film about aftermaths and reckonings. Revisiting material for his earlier 4-part series (1985), Karlin returns to Nicaragua to examine the history of the Sandinista government, consider its achievements, and assess the prospects for democracy following its defeat in the general election of 1990.

Post screening discussion with:

Susan Meiselas, Magnum photographer since 1980 and 1992 MacArthur Fellow.

Hermione Harris, anthropologist; collaborator on the Nicaragua series.

Jonathan Buchsbaum, author of Cinema Sandinista: Filmmaking in Revolutionary Nicaragua, 1979-1990.

Susie Linfield, author of The Cruel Radiance: Photography and Political Violence.

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Organized by Sukhdev Sandhu. QUERIES: [email protected]

Presented by THE COLLOQUIUM FOR UNPOPULAR CULTURE and KING JUAN CARLOS I OF SPAIN CENTER.

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Tonight at 7:00 p.m. - CWS Program - Gabriela Mistral: Conmociones

October 29, 2015

With Juan Gelpí (Universidad de Puerto Rico) -“Entre la paz y la Guerra Fría: La docencia de Gabriela Mistral en la Universidad de Puerto Rico”- and Diamela Eltit -“Gabriela Mistral, signos y consignas”.

Moderated by Lila Zemborain.

In Spanish. Reception to follow.

With the support of NYU Department of Spanish and Portuguese and the MFA Program in Creative Writing in Spanish.

The Creative Writing in Spanish Program acknowledges the generous support of Santander Bank through its Santander Universities Program.


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This Wednesday: Celebrate Mexico Now 2015 -12th Morelia International Film Festival Winners

October 27, 2015

A Celebrate Mexico Now tradition lives on. The Morelia International Film Festival, one of Mexico’s most renowned gatherings for contemporary cinema, presents six award winning short films from its 2014 edition ranging from animation to documentary:

  • Man of Maze ( El hombre del maíz ) by Irving Mondragón; and Stories (Historias) by Ana Ireri Campos Estrada - Special Mention for a Short Documentary
  • Never Come Back (Nunca regreses) by José Leonardo Díaz Vega - Best Work from the Michoacan Section
  • 9:30 am (9:30 am) by Alfonso de la Cruz - Best Animated Short Film
  • The Wear of Agony (El sudor de la agonía) by Mariano Rentería Garnica - Best Short Documentary
  • Ramona (Ramona) by Giovanna Zacarías - Best Short Fiction Film

All films are in Spanish with English subtitles.

This event is part of Celebrate Mexico Now, New York City’s annual festival of contemporary Mexican art, culture and ideas. Additional support for this event by Morelia International Film Festival.

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Panel tonight: Hashtag Latinid#d - 7:00 p.m.

October 26, 2015

This panel will engage the potential and problematics of social media from a Latin@ perspective. Bringing together a scholar, an influencer, and a writer/performer, the panel seeks to move beyond simply celebratory or cautionary approaches in an effort to capture the complexity of Latin@ social media. We also hope to explore the hashtag as a tool for research, activism, and community and creative work. #HashLat.

Panelists: Jillian Báez (College of Staten Island, CUNY), George Torres (Sofrito Media Group, @urbanjibaro), and Jennifer Tamayo (writer, performer, Managing Editor for Futurepoem). Respondent: Juan González (Andrés Bello Chair, King Juan Carlos Center)

Hosted/organized by Urayoán Noel (English, Spanish and Portuguese) and sponsored by Borders and Diasporas and the Latino Studies Program. With the support of NYU King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center.