Upcoming Lectures

KJCC Poetry Series | Reading and conversation with Argentine poets Gerardo Jorge and Guadalupe Wernicke

Reading and conversation with Argentine poets Gerardo Jorge and Guadalupe Wernicke Gerardo Jorge (1980) published the books El hipérbaton (Spiral Jetty, 2011) and Visión de las ciudades (Mansalva, 2014). He won the 2015 Silver Lira at the Lira Festival (Ecuador), which awards the best poetry books published in Spanish every two years. In 2014 he founded the editorial “n direcciones” that has more than 20 titles published. He has a PhD in Literature from the University of Buenos Aires.

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CWS Series | Presentation of Temporales magazine

Introduced by Lila Zemborain and editorial committee  

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Past Lectures

Andrés Bello Chair Professor Julio Ramos 1st Public Lecture | Detroit´s Rivera: public art, film & labor

Andrés Bello Chair Professor Julio Ramos 1st Public Lecture | Detroit´s Rivera: public art, film & labor

Detroit´s Rivera: public art, film and labor Introduction and Screening by Julio Ramos Julio Ramos has written extensively about literary and visual culture in Latin America and the Caribbean. His books include Desencuentros de la modernidad en América Latina: literatura y política en el sigo XIX (1989; translated by John D. Blanco as Divergent Modernities in 2002), Paradojas de la letra (1996, 2007), and Sujeto al límite: ensayos de cultura literaria y visual (2012).

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An Orphan's Tale. The History of the Orphan Manuscript in the Hispanic Society Library, by Dr. Mitchell A. Codding, Executive Director and President, Hispanic Society

An Orphan's Tale. The History of the Orphan Manuscript in the Hispanic Society Library, by Dr. Mitchell A. Codding, Executive Director and President, Hispanic Society

_La Historia del Huérfano_ by Andrés de León (1621) is a curious fiction novel in the style of a biography that remained unpublished until 2017. The manuscript has resided in the library of the Hispanic Society Museum since 1955 and is the only known manuscript of the book.  Organized by the Consulate General of Spain in New York, in collaboration with the Hispanic Society Museum & Library, and NYU King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center.

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Andrés Bello Chair Professor Keila Grinberg Second Public Lecture | Passados Presentes: Slavery and Memory Tourism in Rio de Janeiro

Andrés Bello Chair Professor Keila Grinberg Second Public Lecture | Passados Presentes: Slavery and Memory Tourism in Rio de Janeiro

Recently, slavery has become an important theme in memory tourism. Just last year, in Rio de Janeiro, the Valongo wharf, which was the arrival place of the highest number of enslaved Africans in the Atlantic, was recognized as a UNESCO site, and is now being visited by tourists and students more than ever. In this presentation, Professor Grinberg will discuss “Passados Presentes,” a public digital history project about slavery in Brazil.

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Cajal and the Enchanted Loom, by Rodolfo Llinás

Cajal and the Enchanted Loom, by Rodolfo Llinás

NEW LOCATION Lecture: Cajal and the Enchanted Loom Tuesday, March 6, 6:30 pm **Eisner & Lubin Auditorium, Fourth Floor ** Kimmel Center for University Life - 60 Washington Square South (Picture: Drawing by Santiago Ramón y Cajal) Rodolfo Llinás is Thomas and Suzanne Murphy Professor of Neuroscience and Chairman Emeritus of the Department of Physiology & Neuroscience at the NYU School of Medicine. More on Dr. Llinás This event is part of the exhibit The Beautiful Brain: The Drawings of Santiago Ramón y Cajal, held at NYU Grey Art Gallery between January 9 and March 31, 2018.

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Andrés Bello Chair Professor Keila Grinberg First Public Lecture: Slavery, Illegal Enslavement and International Conflicts in 19th-Century South America

Andrés Bello Chair Professor Keila Grinberg First Public Lecture: Slavery, Illegal Enslavement and International Conflicts in 19th-Century South America

Keila Grinberg, Andrés Bello Chair Professor for Spring 2018, will devote her first public lecture to the ways in which the presence of Brazilian slavery and the illegal enslavement of women and children on the border between Brazil and Uruguay affected international relations between the countries of the La Plata region in the nineteenth century. This contributed fundamentally to the growing tensions that led to the beginning of the Paraguay war (1864-1870), whose causes , however, have been debated ever since the war ended, and remain controversial among historians.

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KJCC Chair Professor María Dolores Jiménez-Blanco's 2nd Public Lecture | Picasso’s Guernica in New York: From Political Icon to Museum Masterpiece?

KJCC Chair Professor María Dolores Jiménez-Blanco's 2nd Public Lecture | Picasso’s Guernica in New York: From Political Icon to Museum Masterpiece?

Guernica, Picasso’s painting for the Spanish Republican Pavilion in the International Exposition of Arts and Techniques of Paris in 1937, had a strong impact on the New York School. It was first exhibited in New York City in May 1939 as a political icon within a campaign to raise funds for the Spanish Republic refugees. In November 1939 it was exhibited again, but this time as an undisputed modern art masterpiece within a great retrospective exhibition on Picasso’s oeuvre at the Museum of Modern Art.

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KJCC Fall Chair Professor María Dolores Jiménez-Blanco First Public Lecture: The Perception of Spanish Art in America: A History of Changes

KJCC Fall Chair Professor María Dolores Jiménez-Blanco First Public Lecture: The Perception of Spanish Art in America: A History of Changes

This is the first public lecture of Professor María Dolores Jiménez-Blanco as NYU KJCC Resident Chair in Spanish Culture and Civilization for the Fall 2017. About the Lecture For centuries, Spanish art was considered only marginal in the international context -a limited deviation from classical excellence. In the 19th century, however, its peculiarity turned positive: in the post-Romantic era, when freedom from the norm and the artist’s commitment to his time became paramount values, Velázquez, Goya and El Greco emerged as true heroes.

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The Emergency Lectures - Politicizing Precariousness - Gabriel Giorgi

The Emergency Lectures - Politicizing Precariousness - Gabriel Giorgi

VIDEO RECORDING OF THE EVENT: From the AIDS epidemic in New York to the politics of human rights in Buenos Aires, activists in the Americas of the late 1980s fought against state policies that defined which human lives should be protected and which lives could be abandoned. These activists created a politics of the precarious that revealed and contested conditions of vulnerability, exposure and survival suffered by citizens who were subject to the dictates of the state.

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The Emergency Lectures: Public Scholarship on Power, Culture, and Resistance - Jo Labanyi

The Emergency Lectures: Public Scholarship on Power, Culture, and Resistance - Jo Labanyi

This series offers public scholarship in an Emergency, presenting thinkers and writers from the NYU intellectual community whose work has an urgent bearing on the present. These experts will present historical and contemporary case studies that can help us to comprehend our political moment and think together, beyond the sense of alarm and anxiety that emergencies provoke. Reflecting on Fascist Europe, authoritarian Argentina, medieval Arab Spain, the Mediterranean, the Global South, the Caribbean, and the United States, the talks will offer historical contexts for the civil and humanitarian emergencies of the present, and provoke conversations that foster our capacity for informed engagement and response.

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A New Farewell to Spain? Catalonia, the Spanish Crisis, and the Echoes of 1898.

A New Farewell to Spain? Catalonia, the Spanish Crisis, and the Echoes of 1898.

Josep Maria Muñoz (Fall 2016 King Juan Carlos Chair in Spanish Culture and Civilization; Historian, Director of L’Avenç magazine) In Spain today, one hears old lamentations about new crises. The lasting impact of the 2008 financial crisis and its social consequences have produced a persistent new pessimism, one that has overshadowed the decades of economic growth and social welfare that Spain achieved with a democratic government and integration into the European Union.

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José Quiroga
"Wanton Escapes: A Primer on Flight"
José Muñoz Memorial Lecture

José Quiroga "Wanton Escapes: A Primer on Flight" José Muñoz Memorial Lecture

On June 28, 1856, residents of Havana were called upon to witness yet another neighbor who had decided to get himself onto a balloon and fly. Balloon flights had become a fad and a frenzy in Havana at that time: Virginia Marotte, from Orleans, was the first woman aeronaut, and it is said that Domingo Blinó ecstatically threw pigeons, flowers, poems–and apparently two goats– overboard before he crashed near the port of Mariel.

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Displaced Empathies: The Abolitionist as Witness and Translator by Gerard Aching

Displaced Empathies: The Abolitionist as Witness and Translator by Gerard Aching

Gerard Aching is Professor of Africana and Romance Studies at Cornell University, and Director of the Africana Studies and Research Center, Cornell University. Introduced by Gabriela Basterra (NYU Department of Spanish and Portuguese.)

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Creative Writing in Spanish: Miguel Angel Hernández and Reinaldo Laddaga

Creative Writing in Spanish: Miguel Angel Hernández and Reinaldo Laddaga

Spanish writer Miguel Angel Hernández will read his text: “El arte en la novela: contaminaciones entre crítica y literatura”; Argentinian wtiter Reinaldo Ladagga will present “Editor, curador, escritor, artista: juego de roles en la literatura y el arte contemporáneos.” Introduced by writer and essayist Sergio Chejfec (NYU Creative Writing in Spanish Program). With the support of NYU Department of Spanish and Portuguese and the MFA Program in Creative Writing in Spanish.

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Zuleica Romay: Estudios Afroamericanos en la Cuba del Siglo XXI

Zuleica Romay: Estudios Afroamericanos en la Cuba del Siglo XXI

Zuleica Romay, former director of the Instituto Cubano del Libro and now Director of the Program on Afro American Studies at Casa de las Americas, will be at NYU KJCC/CLACS speaking on “Estudios afroamericanos en la Cuba del silo XXI.” In Spanish. Lunch will be provided. Zuleica Romay | Credits: In Havana with Risquet

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Reporting on War and Power in the Americas

Reporting on War and Power in the Americas

Join Jon Lee Anderson, Spring 2016 Andrés Bello Chair in Latin American Cultures and Civilizations, journalist, biographer, war correspondent and New Yorker staff writer, in his first public lecture entitled “Reporting on War and Power in the Americas.” Check the lecture below.

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Tribunes for the People: Rebel Latino Writers in American Journalism, from Ricardo Flores Magón and Jovita Idar to Jesús Colón

Tribunes for the People: Rebel Latino Writers in American Journalism, from Ricardo Flores Magón and Jovita Idar to Jesús Colón

By Juan González, Fall 2015 Andrés Bello Chair in Latin American Cultures and Civilizations (Columnist for The Daily News, co-host of Democracy Now! )

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Puerto Rico’s Debt Crisis: Economic Collapse in America’s Biggest Colony and What Can Be Done about It

Puerto Rico’s Debt Crisis: Economic Collapse in America’s Biggest Colony and What Can Be Done about It

Could Puerto Rico become America’s Greece? That’s a question many are asking as the island faces a devastating financial crisis and a rapidly crumbling healthcare system. Puerto Rico owes $72 billion in debt. $355 million in debt payments are due December 1, but it increasingly looks like the U.S. territory may default on at least some of the debt. Congress has so far failed to act on an Obama administration proposal that includes extending bankruptcy protection to Puerto Rico and allocating more equitable Medicaid and Medicare funding for the island.

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Expanding the Narrative: The Struggle for Latino Studies and American Higher Education.

Expanding the Narrative: The Struggle for Latino Studies and American Higher Education.

With Virginia Sánchez-Korrol (Professor Emerita and former Chair of the Department of Puerto Rican and Latino Studies at Brooklyn College, City University of New York); and Carlos Muñoz, Jr. (Professor Emeritus, Department of Ethnic Studies, UC Berkeley, and founding chair of the National Association of Chicano and Chicana Studies (NACCS).

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The Young Lords and the Modern Latino Community

The Young Lords and the Modern Latino Community

With Johanna Fernandez (Assistant Professor of History, Baruch College; author of the forthcoming book, When the World Was Their Stage: A History of the Young Lords Party, 1968-1974.); Darrel Wanzer-Serrano (Assistant Professor of Rhetoric and Pubic Advocacy, The University of Iowa; author of The New York Young Lords and the Struggle for Liberation); Iris Morales (former leader of the Young Lords Party and producer of the PBS documentary, Palante, Siempre Palante!

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Lecture | Between Basques and Jews: How the Spaniards became a Race, by Jean-Frédéric Schaub

Lecture | Between Basques and Jews: How the Spaniards became a Race, by Jean-Frédéric Schaub

During Spain’s transition to democracy, the Basque nationalists resumed spreading the old theory that their people’s stock had a biological specific profile. Non-nationalist Basque intellectuals reacted by reminding that the myth of the Basque racial identity was tightly related to the Spanish Medieval hatred against the Jews and the Moors. The lecture will present the vain quest for a Spanish ethnic identity, since the Renaissance to Modern times, by considering its relationship with both the segregation of the religious minorities and the fetishizing of the Basque purity.

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Lecture | Universalism and Racism, by Professor Jean-Frédéric Schaub

Lecture | Universalism and Racism, by Professor Jean-Frédéric Schaub

This presentation examines the contradictions that emerged between universalist ambitions and three historical processes: categorization, segregation, and extermination. In studying the societies of the late Middle Ages and the Early Modern era, the question arises of the incompatibility between, on the one hand, Saint Paul’s message (“There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free man, there is neither male nor female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus.

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